Not everyone who works his way to achieving a great physique has always been athletic and fit. London’s Mehmet Edip, now 28, admits he was addicted to sugary, high-carb foods, which contributed to a slightly chubby physique. But he had a passion for sports and to help improve his game, he began weight training. He soon found a new hobby and the changes it made to his physique made the 5’9” salesman for a printing company even more committed. Ultra-FIT caught up with Mehmet recently to ask him about his training and how he got started.

Why did you get into fitness?

I wasn’t the healthiest child. I was even slightly overweight, in part because I really enjoyed my high-carb foods – breads, pasta, waffles, cakes. As a teen I started to participate more in team sports, such as football, hockey and tennis. It was about that time, I purchased my first set of dumbbells and my love of fitness started from then.

RELATED: RECOMMENDED PLANS FOR YOU

What motivates you to work out?

Sometimes having to go to the gym is difficult, especially when you look outside and the weather is glum and dreary. But one of the things that keeps me going is the feelgood factor that a workout brings and the endorphin rush you get after you’re done. When preparing for a fitness contest my motivation is to try and win that contest and that is all I focus on, nothing else. Getting motivated during this period is a whole lot easier as there is an end goal in sight.

Are you self-coached or do you have a coach?

While I’m not a nutrition expert nor have an advanced degree in exercise science, I have educated myself through trial and error, which makes me my own coach. At first, when I first started this journey, I didn’t realise what effect carbohydrates or protein would have on my body and I didn’t know my triceps muscle from my biceps!The first thing I did was to read on exercise and find out as mush as I could.

I also asked for advice. I find that many people tend to be intimidated in a gym environment and are scared to ask others for advice, but the only way I was going to improve was by breaking my silence. I am by no means an expert and continue to educate myself by researching different exercise techniques and putting them to the test in the gym.

 What type of training have you found works best for you?

During my off-season (when training to add size), I tend to go heavy and hard for three sets of 8-10 reps with a fairly heavier weight. But when preparing for a shoot or contest I tend to do a lot more tri-sets and super-sets – doing multiple exercises back to back with no rest between, with a weight that’s about 5060% lighter than what I’d normally do.

What’s your favorite workout?

Currently I don’t have a favorite workout but I do enjoy all types of resistance exercise, especially with cables as I feel this always gives me a good pump. Cables are a bit different than free weights in that the line of pull is coming from the sides, rather than directly downward – so there’s constant tension on the muscle from the bottom of the range of motion to the top – there’s no resting spot.

What’s your favorite workout?

Currently I don’t have a favorite workout but I do enjoy all types of resistance exercise, especially with cables as I feel this always gives me a good pump. Cables are a bit different than free weights in that the line of pull is coming from the sides, rather than directly downward – so there’s constant tension on the muscle from the bottom of the range of motion to the top – there’s no resting spot.

What’s your weakest body part and how do you attack it?

Currently my weakest body part are my quadriceps. I’m concentrating on this muscle group at the moment in order to add size, so I’m training it more frequently than the other bodyparts and using a greater variety of exercise and intensity-boosting techniques to really make them work harder. It’s painful work sometimes, but that’s the price to pay to take your physique to the next level.

What are your plans for the future?

I’d like to do more work fitness modeling, not just in the UK but in the U.S. and internationally. I’ll continue to compete in the UK but my goal is be successful on the international scene.

Mehmet Edip makes a change_1

What training tips do you have for someone wanting to build muscle?

I believe that you need to follow a systematic programme, rather than just some random workout in which you walk into the gym without a plan. That means having a workout in mind before you hit the weights. A lot of enthusiastic people work out hard but fail to realise that while muscular growth is initiated in the gym, it actually takes place during periods of recuperation – making a very powerful reason as to why nutrition and rest are so important.

Enthusiasm will take you only so far at the gym. Science tells us that for optimal muscular development, you need to do multiple sets of a given exercise (3-5) and induce muscle failure between 8-12 reps, taking fairly short (1-2 minute) rest intervals between sets.It goes without saying that strict form should be used to optimise muscle building and reduce your risk of injury and all movements should be done through a full range of movement.

Finally, a number of people do go to the gym regularly but fail to make progress.Most often this is because their body has adapted to their routine already. Making a change in your physique requires you to challenge yourself in the gym by doing something that’s harder than what you did before.

What diet tips have you found important to your success?

 To build muscle I’d recommend focusing on lean protein sources like skinless turkey and chicken breasts, egg whites and fish, and whole-grain carbs, like oatmeal,brown rice and sweet potatoes. It’s best to avoid sugary, processed foods as they’re not only empty calories but alter your blood glucose levels and insulin response, setting you up for weight and fat gains.

I’d also suggest eating six smaller meals throughout the day rather than just three larger ones, which keeps a steady supply of nutrients coming into your body and avoids the highs and lows in your blood glucose.

Each meal should contain about 35 grams of protein (depending on your bodyweight;I go by the formula that you should consume11.5g of protein per pound of bodyweight per day, divided evenly over six meals). Post-workout – to pack on size – you should consume fast-absorbing carbohydrates (simple sugars as well as white potatoes or white rice) along with your protein source.

What does a typical training week look like?

When not concentrating on one particular muscle group, a typical week looks like this:

mehmet edip

WatchFit Experts change lives!

And they can do the same for you.

Expert:

Pollyanna Hale Health and Lifestyle coaches
Lost 13 Kg in Total
Mel, 32y Location: London, United Kingdom Working with Pollyanna changed everything. I lost 13kg, got toned and have more energy than ever! Get same results!

Expert:

Chriz Zaremba Fitness Consultant
Lost 45 Kg in Total
Chris, 50y Location: London, United Kingdom Lost 45kg after the age of 50 and now competes and wins physique competitions and runs marathons Check our weight loss plans