This total beginner to 5km 10 week training program is guaranteed to steadily improve and ease you in to a strong 5km time.

The training program is 10 weeks long and split into 2 sections that work together to make sure you not only incrementally increase your fitness level to enable you to run the 5km but whether it be for yourself alone or in a competitive race.

The first part of the training program is the actually the running program, this is the main and most important section as running continually is the key to being able to increase your base level of cardio vascular fitness to enable you to work for the longer periods of time needed to complete a continuous 5km run or race.

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The sections in the below training program highlighted in blue explain what running you will be doing on that day.There are 3 types of training you will be doing in order to achieve what is needed to complete the 5k:

The interval training which will increase your cardio vascular fitness level, the long run that will increase cardio vascular & muscular endurance, lastly we have the strength and conditioning training that increases your running performance through performing running specific exercises making your muscles stronger and allowing you to run faster and easier.

Interval training explained

The interval training sections displayed as for example “Run 1min walk 3min x5 for a total of 20 minutes” this simply means you run at your own running pace continuously for 1 minute then walk 3 minutes, using this time to recover your energy and breath. Once the 3 minutes recovery is up you run for 1 minute and repeat the rest period again until the 5 sets are complete.

Week one

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20 Min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20Min

Foam rolling

Rest

0.5k

There is also on a Sunday your long run day. The long run day is where you find your pre determined route or distance and run that distance trying not to stop at any point. However if you do need to stop keep your rest to a minimum and continue at your running pace again as quickly as you can.

Factoring in rest days, interval run days, strength and conditioning programming and long run days the full program below will increase health and fitness to a level able to run a 5k.

The running program

Week one

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20 Min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20Min

Foam rolling

Rest

0.5k

Week two

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 22.5min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X5

Total 22.5min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.0k

Week three

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.5k

Week four

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 2 min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2min

Walk 2min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.0k

Week five

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.5k

Week six

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2 min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.0k

Week seven

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.5k

Week eight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.0k

Week nine

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.5k

Week ten

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

5.0k

The strength and conditioning section is outlined below as well as the rehab and foam rolling section.

The strength and conditioning section is purely running specific exercises aiming to improve performance and reduce the potential of injury and works hand in hand with the running program.

Runners come in all shapes and sizes, are of all ages and have a million different reasons for wanting to run. One thing every runner has in common however, is the desire to be able to run a little faster, perhaps a little easier, picking up fewer injuries along the way.

Certainly to run faster it would seem logical that the more miles you put in, the faster you will become. There is of course a correlation between training volume and increased speed, but there are also limitations with this.

More and more elite distance runners are turning to strength training to provide the edge over their competitors for the simple reason that it works. Look at Mo Farah for example one of the best long distance runners at this moment in time, he performs single leg power snatches whilst standing on a bosu! This might not mean anything to you now but I’ll tell you, that it is super impressive.

Running strength conditioning differs from traditional gym based weight training by virtue of its functionality. Every exercise in the below program has been specifically selected to achieve a particular goal that will directly affect your running.

Compare a single leg squat, where you are supporting your entire body weight on one leg and driving up away from the ground (sounding similar to running yet?), with a leg extension machine in a gym. Sitting down and straightening your leg may well strengthen the front of the thigh, but not in the way these muscles are used in the running action (furthermore, how often do you sit down to run?).

Machine based training can never come close to competing with dynamic exercises such as the single leg squat, where an integration of core stabilization, balance, hip stability and strength combine to replicate the demands placed on our bodies as we run.

Even “functional” exercises such as the squat don’t have the same carry over to running as you may initially think. After all, you run on one leg at a time rather than two.

This training program is based on an understanding of how the body works, and exercises that have been proved time and time again to increase running performance.

The mechanics of running

Running occurs mainly in the sagittal (forwards) plane although there is also a small amount of movement in the frontal (sideways) and transverse (twisting) planes of movement.

When the foot hits the ground (known as the contact of stance phase) the ankle joint moves into what is known as pronation. You may have heard this term in relation to the type of shoe you should wear – over-pronators should generally wear motion control shoes for example. Essentially, pronation is where the inside arch of the foot rolls closer towards the ground.

When the foot strikes the ground and pronates, the hip joint rotates inwards. Now as the body starts to pass over the foot, this leg is supporting your entire body weight. The other leg meanwhile is coming through in what is known as swing phase.

About midway through the stance phase (mid-stance phase) the leg starts to rotate outwards again, and the ankle joint “supinates” back to its start position.

The foot now starts to propel the body forwards and the heel begins to rise off the ground. Stance phase ends as soon as the toe leaves the ground, at which point that leg enters its own swing phase.

Whilst all this is going on, the pelvis tilts to the front, whilst tipping in the sideways plane. Further up the spine the thoracic vertebrae (at about chest height) rotate and the opposite arm swings through to aid propulsion.

Essentially, the running gait cycle is a series of loading and unloading of our muscles, with actions and reactions occurring right the way up from the foot to the top of the spine. It is easy to see how instabilities (especially around the hips and core) can lead to both inefficient running and potential injuries if left unchecked.

The strength and conditioning phase

This 10 week program is split into 3 phases, running alongside the periodized cardio vascular element of the program. The strength and conditioning program runs through basic stability and flexibility, functional strength, and onto functional power.

The ultimate goal of the program is to increase the amount of power you can generate from a stable base when running. This in turn will lead to faster, easier and more enjoyable running.

Before we start the power training phase however, It is essential that we have sufficient strength in our muscles and connective tissues (such as ligaments and tendons).

By performing a period of functional strength training we can prepare the body for the increased stresses of the power training phase.

Strengthening tight muscles will only serve to increase the tightness, and without a strong foundation to work from, strength training will have little effect on increasing running speed.

By preceding the strength training phase with a period of stability and flexibility training, we can optimize the benefits gained from an increase in strength.

Flexibility and stability phase

Week one

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20 Min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20Min

Foam rolling

Rest

0.5k

Week two

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 22.5min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X5

Total 22.5min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.0k

Week three

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.5k

Flexibility exercises

1. Hamstring stretch

1x 20s hold at each part of sequence

Benefits

Stretches hamstring which, when tight, can lead to poor posture, muscle imbalances and reduced stride length.

Description

Kneeling on your right knee lean over your left foot to introduce the stretch into your left hamstring. and hold this position for 20 seconds (position 1).

Drop your left elbow down towards the ground and hold this new position for a further 20 seconds (position 2).

Bring your right hand closer of your left foot and twist your body to the left (position 3).

Repeat on the right side.

Coaching points

Keep a slight bend in the front knee Stretch to the point where it is “comfortably uncomfortable”.

Exercise options

Reduce the range of movement to make the stretch slightly less intense.

2. Hip flexor stretch

1x 20s hold at each part of sequence

Benefits:   Stretches hip flexors which, when tight can contribute towards an unstable pelvis and lower back, reducing running efficiency and increasing risk of injury. It can also reduce stride length.

Description

Kneel on your left knee with your right foot forwards and lean forwards as far as you can until you feel a stretch start to develop in the front of the rear thigh.

Raise both arms overhead and hold this position for 20 seconds.

Flex your arms to the right, holding for 20 seconds (position 1), then flex to the left and hold for 20 seconds (position 2).

From this position, rotate around to the right until you feel the stretch hold for 20 seconds (position 3).

Repeat the sequence on the other side.

Coaching points

Squeeze your bottom as you push your hips forwards

Keep your spine extended throughout the sequence – imagine pulling your head upwards with a piece of string.

Exercise options

Reduce the range of movement, or perform the movements with just one hand whilst the other hand holds a wall for support.

3. Glute stretch 1x 20s hold at each part of sequence
Benefits  The glutes are the powerhouse of the running action, so tightness here will severely restrict the power available to propel you forwards. Additionally, tight, inactive glutes are a common factor in many running related injuries so stretching them thoroughly can help reduce injury risk.

Description

Kneeling with your left knee directly by your left hand, right leg stretched out behind you, point your left foot towards the right to bring the side of your shin onto the floor (position 1).

Lift your body tall and then lower down towards the ground and hold this position for 20 seconds (position 2).

Stay low and twist your body around towards the left, then hold this new position for 20 seconds (position 3).

Remain low and twist all the way around towards the right, holding this position for 20 seconds (position 4).

Repeat on the other side.

Coaching points

Imagine pushing your hips towards the ground.

Keep the hips aligned – try to avoid sinking onto one side.

Exercise options

Reduce the range of movement as you rotate.

4. IT Band stretch

1x30s hold

Benefits The IT band runs the length of your outer thigh and is partly responsible for the tracking of your kneecap. A tight ITB can lead to “runner’s knee” as well as other running related injuries so stretching it regularly can help avoid this.

Pictures description

Stand with a wall on your right hand side and cross your left foot over in front of your right.

Place your right hand up on the wall and push your left hip down and towards the wall with your left hand (position 1).

Feel the stretch in the outside of the right hip then hold for 30 seconds.

Repeat on the other side.

Coaching points

Try to keep your body upright – avoid bending forwards.

Exercise options

Increase or decrease the range of movement as required.

5. Calf stretch

1x60s

Benefits

Your calves and Achilles tendons are responsible for storing much of the energy used to propel your body forwards with each step. Tightness in this area will lead to tight calves during your runs and potentially injury

Description

Stand facing a wall with your left foot behind the right, pointing directly towards the wall.

Lean forwards, keeping your left heel on the ground and your left knee straight until you feel a stretch in the lower leg (position 1).

Hold this position for 10 seconds then gently allow the left knee to bend and the heel to rise slightly off the ground (position 2).

Hold this position for 10 seconds and then return to position 1.

Repeat this for 3 times through at each position before repeating on the other side.

Coaching points

Keep the back foot pointing directly towards the wall.

Keep your back aligned throughout the stretch.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the range of movement as required.

6. Rotations

2x30s hold each position

Benefits Much of the force transferred through the body as you run is absorbed by the rotation of the spine. Restrictions in rotational mobility can lead to reduced efficiency and increased stresses in other areas of the body as you run.

Description

Lie on your back, right leg straight and left knee bent.

With your left arm out away from your body, pull your knee across the body and towards the floor with your right hand (position 1).

Hold this stretch for 30 seconds, taking deep breaths and increasing the stretch each time you exhale.

Repeat on the other side.

Coaching points

Keep your opposite shoulder on the floor.

Imagine pushing your hips around into the stretch.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the range of movement as required.

Stability exercises

7. Balance Matrix

3 x each side

Benefits

Increased stability in the hips and core results in more efficient running as less force is wasted on unwanted reactive movements.

 

Description

Balance on your left foot and lean backwards slightly, bringing your right foot forwards. Lean forwards and gently swing the leg to the rear.

Your body and leg should form a straight line throughout.

Complete the desired number of repetitions then repeat on the other side.

Balance on your left foot once again, and lift your right leg out to the side whilst leaning across to the left.

Bring the right foot back across and in front of your body and lean slightly to the right.

Complete the desired number of repetitions then repeat on the other side.

Balance on your left foot once again, and rotate your hips and body to bring your right foot around to the side.

Return to the centre then continue through to “close” the hips off (position 6).

Complete the desired number of repetitions then repeat on the other side.

Coaching points

Draw the belly button in towards the spine throughout the movement.

Maintain an upright posture.

Exercise options

Rather than lifting the foot off the floor, gently slide it along the floor for each of the movements.

8. Prone cobra

2×10 5s holds

Benefits

A strong lower back is essential to allow proper upright posture whilst running

Description

Lie on your front with your arms to the side of your body.

Squeeze your bum and lift your chest and shoulders off the floor as far as you can (you should feel the lower back activating) (position 2).

As you lift, rotate your arms around to bring your thumbs to the outside.

Hold the top position for 5 seconds before lowering back down again and repeating.

Coaching points

Keep your focus down throughout the movement.

Exercise options

Advance this exercise by bringing your finger tips to your temples (harder, position 3) or straighten your arms out to 45 degrees in front of you (hardest, position 4). You can also increase the length of time you hold the top position for.

Functional strength phase

Perform the whole series of strength exercises 2 – 3 times a week.

Continue exercises 1 – 6 from stability flexibility phase after every run during this phase. You may also continue with the stability exercises two or three times a week (recommended as part of a warm up before a run) whilst in the Strength Phase.

Week four

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 2 min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2min

Walk 2min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.0k

Week five

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.5k

Week six

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2 min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.0k

Week seven

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.5k

Strength exercises

1. Clock squat

2×4 each side

Benefits Running happens one leg at a time, and this exercise strengthens the muscles around the hip, knee and ankles whilst supporting the body weight on one leg. It also involves movements in several directions, replicating the various stresses of running.

Description

Balance on your left leg and squat down whilst pushing your right leg out in front of you (position 1 – 12 o’clock); return to an upright position.

Push the right leg out to the side (position 2 – 3 o’clock), keeping the weight over the left foot as you squat down; return to the start position.

Push the right leg out to the rear (position 3 – 6 o’clock) as you squat down; return to the start position.

Twist the right leg around to the left behind the left leg (position 4 – 9 o’clock position) as you squat down; return to the start position.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions before swapping legs and repeating on the other side.

Coaching points

Keep the weight through the heel throughout the sequence.

Keep the knee aligned and slightly behind the toes.

Keep the back flat and the tummy button drawn in towards the spine.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the range of movement as you need to change the intensity of the exercise.

2. Back to front lunge

2×10 each side

Benefits

The lunge is a very close approximation to the movements experienced when running, except through a larger range of movement. This exercise challenges the strength of the hips and core to move the body over your stance foot.

Description

Lunge forwards with your left leg, lifting the arms overhead and positioning the front knee over the toes, rear leg stretched out behind (position 1).

Keeping the weight through the left heel, drive back upwards and all the way back into a rear lunge The weight should now be on the right foot, once again directed through the heel (this activates the glutes).

Touch the ground with both hands.

Continue to perform these “back to front” lunges for the desired number of repetitions before swapping sides and repeating on the other side.

Coaching points

Keep your tummy button drawn slightly in towards your spine throughout the movement.

Imagine being drawn upwards by a piece of string tied to the top of your head to maintain an upright posture.

Exercise options

Reduce the range of movement to reduce the intensity of this exercise. Hold a light (up to 5kg) weight in both hands to increase the intensity.

3. Side step downs

2×10 each side

Benefits Increases single leg strength whilst improving stability of the hip.

Description

Stand at the side of a step (or bottom stair) on your right foot with your left foot level, but hanging over the edge (position 1).

Lower into a squat position, driving the heel of the left foot towards the ground (position 2).

At the bottom of the movement, only allow the left heel to gently touch the floor (no weight should be taken through it) before squeezing the right glute and returning to the start position.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions before changing legs and repeating on the other side.

Coaching points

Keep the weight through the heel of the stance leg and the knee back behind the toes.

Allow your arms to lift upwards as you lower yourself down to help with balance.

Maintain a good upright posture, tummy button drawn in towards the spine.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the height of the step to alter the intensity of this exercise.

4. Twist lunge with floor touch

2×10 each side

Benefits Strengthens the outside of the hip and glutes to provide strength on uneven ground and when changing direction.

Description

Stand with feet together (position 1) and take a long step to the left, turning your body to face the direction of movement.

Keeping your right leg straight, touch the floor with both hands (position 2).

Return to the start position by squeezing the glutes and driving upwards through the left heel whilst bringing the body back into alignment.

Repeat on the other side then repeat for the desired number of repetitions.

Coaching points

Keep the weight through the heel as you drive back to the start position.

Lift the shoulders first to activate the glutes.

Exercise options

Hold a heavy object (up to 5kg) in your hands to increase the intensity of this exercise. Reduce the range of movement or drop the twist component all together if necessary to make it less challenging.

5. Hamstring lunge

2×8 each side

Benefits This exercise incorporates a full range of motion movement whilst building strength and stability specific to the running action.

Description

Place your hands and feet on the floor, approximately shoulder and hip width apart respectively.

Drop your bum back towards your heels to “load the spring” (position 1) then pounce your right foot forwards to the outside of your right hand.

Drop the hips as low as you can so you feel the stretch through your right leg and hip.

Hold it there for a second, then replace your right hand outside of the right foot (position 2).

Now lift the hips to straighten the right leg and feel the stretch through the hamstring (position3).

Drop the hips back down and step your foot back to the start position before repeating on the other side.

Complete the desired number of repetitions.

Coaching points

Keep the weight through the hands throughout the sequence.

Exercise options

Place your hands on a step to reduce the range of movement, or increase the range by dropping the elbow further and lifting the hips higher.

7. Swiss ball knee driver

2×8 each side

Benefits

This exercise strengthens both the muscles involved in running, and the nervous system signal used to control them. Increased function of your “software” will translate into improved running efficiency

Description

Lie on a Swiss ball with your shoulders over the mid-line and head resting on the ball, feet hip width apart.

Lower the hips towards the floor, “wrapping” the back around the ball.

Maintaining control, drive upwards through the heels then at the top lift the left foot off the floor and bring the left knee up in to the air.

Pause for a second at the top of the movement then lower back to the floor to repeat on the other side.

Complete the desired number of repetitions.

Coaching points

Keep the belly button drawn in towards the spine.

Allow your head to lift off the ball as you lower your hips towards the floor.

Drive the movement by squeezing your glutes.

Exercise options

Hold onto a wall if you struggle with balance. Bring your arms overhead to increase the challenge.

8. Swiss ball tuck

2×12

Benefits Whilst glute strength is essential for developing a strong drive, the hip flexors are the key muscles involved in bringing the knee through ready for the next step. This exercise strengthens these important muscles, along with increasing abdominal and core strength.

Description

Roll out over a Swiss ball until your feet are resting on the centre of the ball.

Keeping the weight over your hands and shoulders steady, roll the ball in towards your chest, pause for a second then roll back to the start position.

Complete the desired number of repetitions.

Coaching points

Don’t allow the shoulders to roll backwards with the ball.

Keep the belly button drawn in towards the spine.

Hold your spine in neutral at the start of each repetition – a slight curve in the lower back, shoulders, hips and ankles in a straight line.

Exercise options

Position the ball on just above the knees to make the exercise less challenging or perform the single leg version to increase its intensity.

Functional power phase

Perform the whole series of exercise twice a week after a thorough warm up.

Continue to perform the stretches (exercises 1 – 6 from stability flexibility phase) after every run during this power phase.

Week eight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.0k

Week nine

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.5k

Week ten

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

5.0k

Power exercises

1. Washing machine

3x 30s, 2 mins rest

Benefits Develops rotational power in conjunction with the stride movement.

Description

Stand in a lunge position with your right foot forwards, hands held across the chest, turning towards the right.

Quickly jump and change legs whilst twisting your upper body to the left before immediately jumping back to the start position.

Continue for the desired number of repetitions.

Coaching points

Keep your body upright throughout the movement, head facing forwards.

Draw the tummy button in towards the spine.

Exercise options

To make the exercise less challenging, reduce the range of movement. Increase the intensity by holding a light weight across your chest.

2. Sprinters snatch

2×10, 2 mins rest

Benefits

Develops single leg power through a large range of movement

Description

Lunge backwards with your left leg, keeping the weight through the right heel and touch the ground with both hands (position 1).

Powerfully drive your body upwards (position 2), reaching overhead with your hands and bringing your left knee through.

Pause at the top for a second before returning back to the start position without touching the ground with the left foot.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions before swapping sides and repeating on the other leg.

Coaching points

Keep the back in a neutral alignment – don’t allow it to round out at the point you initiate the movement.

Lift the shoulders and body first rather than starting the movement by lifting the hips.

Exercise options

Lower your hands just past the knee to reduce the intensity of this exercise, or hold a pair of light weights in your hands (up to 5kg) to increase the intensity.

3. Multi- directional hops

1×5

Benefits Develops single leg power stability in a variety of planes of movement, essential for increased strength on hill climbs.

 

Description

Balance on your left foot and squat down keeping the weight through your heel (position 1).

Hop to the left as far as you can, landing on the same foot and immediately dropping back into a squat to absorb the impact (position 2).

Hop back to the left again to make 1 repetition then repeat for the desired number.

Change legs and repeat.

Once you have completed the side hops on both legs, balance on your left foot, drop into a squat and hop forwards as far as you can, landing on the same foot.

Drop into a squat on landing to absorb the impact then immediately hop backwards, landing on the same foot again.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions then swap to the other leg and repeat.

Once you have completed the front / back hops on both legs, balance on your left foot, drop into a squat and hop to the left whilst turning your body to face the left.

Immediately on landing on the same foot, drop into a squat position and drive back to the right and turn so you are facing this direction.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions then change legs and repeat.

Coaching points

Try to land as softly as possible.

Keep your back in neutral and as upright as possible throughout the movement.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the range of movement to vary the intensity of this exercise.

4. Ice skaters

3x 30s, 3 mins rest

Benefits

Develops single leg power and stability

Pictures

Description

Balance on your right foot, lower into a squat position (position 1) and leap to your left as far as you can.

Land on your left foot, immediately absorb the impact by dropping down into a squat (position 2) and leap back to the right as far as you can.

Repeat for the desired number of repetitions (a single repetition is complete as you return to the start position).

Coaching points

Try to land as lightly as possible.

Keep the weight through the heel of the grounded foot.

Exercise options

Reduce the range of movement to reduce the intensity of the exercise. To increase the challenge, as you land twist your body around and touch the outside of your grounded foot with your opposite hand.

5. Power skipping

3×10 each side, 2 mins rest

Benefits Improves single leg power through a full range of movement.

Description

Find some space you can skip for around 30m. If this is not possible, you can perform this exercise on the spot, just focus on the drive upwards rather then forwards!

Start the skipping action then once the rhythm is established increase the height of the skips, driving your opposite knee and your hand as high into the air as possible (position 2).

Perform as many high skips on each leg as required.

Coaching points

Drive off the toes.

Keep the belly button drawn in and the body in an upright position.

Exercise options

Reduce or increase the range of movement to vary the intensity.

6. Pistons

3x 30s

Benefits

Increases upper body power for the arm drive. As the arms control how quickly the legs come through on the swing phase of running, developing power and stability here increases overall running power

Description

Stand with both feet slightly apart, knees slightly bent.

Bring your arms up to a 90 degree bend and start pumping them in the running action as fast as you can (position 1 / 2).

Continue for the desired length of time.

Coaching points

Draw the belly button in towards the spine.

Focus on driving the elbows back behind you rather than punching the hands forwards.

Hold the hands loosely rather than tightening them into firsts.

Keep the shoulder relaxed – don’t let them lift too much.

Exercise options

Hold a pair of light weights in your hands (up to 2kg) to increase the intensity. Slow the tempo down to reduce it.

The whole program

Week one

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20 Min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1Min

Walk 3Min x5

Total 20Min

Foam rolling

Rest

0.5k

Week two

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 22.5min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 1.5min

Walk 3min X5

Total 22.5min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.0k

Week three

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Strength and conditioning

Flexibility/ Stability

Run 2 min

Walk 3 min X 5

Total 25min

Foam rolling

Rest

1.5k

Week four

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 2 min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2min

Walk 2min X 7

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.0k

Week five

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 1min

Walk 3min X 5

Total 20min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

2.5k

Week six

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 2min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 2 min

Walk 1.5min X 8

Total 28min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.0k

Week seven

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Run 3min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 31.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Strength

Foam rolling

3.5k

Week eight

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1.5min X 7

Total 35min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.0k

Week nine

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 3.5min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 40.5min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

4.5k

Week ten

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Rest

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Run 4min

Walk 1min X 9

Total 45min

Strength and conditioning

Functional Power

Foam rolling

5.0k

Enjoy the program and love your running!

Paul Cheesman

#BeYourOwnHero

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