5km is 3.2-miles. The following article will help you understand how to not only train for a 5km run, but how to do so in a way that leads to having a lower run time.

The body has several energy systems it uses. When the body needs energy to perform a movement for thirty seconds it uses the phospagen system, where stored ATP is converted into energy. After thirty seconds, if the body is still moving, then the system it uses to create energy is anaerobic glycolysis.

Should the body continue to move after three minutes it will utilize aerobic glycolysis to provide the energy needed to support the movement. After twenty minute,s the body uses the beta oxidation system, where fat is burned to create energy, to support physical activity.

RELATED: RECOMMENDED PLANS FOR YOU

Also check out First marathon training: how to make it a success

The aforementioned metabolic example is a simplified explanation of how the body creates and uses energy. In a 5к run the body should not have to utilize a majority of its beta oxidation capability, perhaps not any.

The runner should complete the distance in less than twenty minutes. During the run all energy systems are working in concert, but the percentage of contribution to creating the energy required to support body movement differs as the activity continues.

Intra-workout nutrition is not required, because this event is less than one hour. The body should be able to use enough of its own stores to create energy to support movement before it runs out of them. The time at which the body runs out of ATP, glucose, glycogen, or lipid (fat) stores differs for each individual but the hypothesis used in this article will be sixty minutes.

After sixty minutes the practitioner may have to continually ingest a fast-digesting high glycemic index carbohydrate so that the body can use the ingested substance by converting it to energy because all stored substrates have been depleted. Fast-digestion means that the body takes a lot less time to break down food and absorb nutrients; non-solid food items such as powders, gels, and fluids tend to have this property.

To support the type of stress placed on the body from prolonged activity these types of items are important to consume. Given the duration of the 5-km this should not be an issue.

During anaerobic exercise the demand that the body has for oxygen goes up. While anaerobic exercises allow the body to increase its ability to demand oxygen, aerobic exercises increase the ability of the body to supply itself with oxygen. The rate at which the body delivers oxygen to its tissues is known as VO2Max.

Aerobic activity affects VO2Max while anaerobic activity affects cardiac output. For an unfit beginner the ability of the body to deliver oxygen to itself is poor as is the ability of the heart rate to drop down to resting from near maximal levels. Over time these categories tend to improve with routine workouts due to the specific adaptation of imposed demand (SAID) that takes place in the body.

Unfit beginners, or fit beginners, may experience lactic acid build-up. Discomfort in the form of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) usually is associated with lactic acid. When all of the body stores have been depleted and oxygen demanded does not equal oxygen supplied then the body restricts movement by creating lactic acid.

Cramps are also another possible discomfort that a runner may feel during or after a workout. Usually if the cramp is in the thoracic region then that is associated with breathing and if the cramp is located at the calf or below then it may be associated with dehydration.A 5k training plan to awaken your hidden strengths _2

The runner should have consumed the last meal before the run between four hours before the run and no sooner than forty-five minutes before the run.

For each person the amount of water the body absorbs differs due to biochemical individuality but this article will assume that a person absorbs four ounces every twenty minutes.

Such an amount of water or fluid should be consumed as often as possible when awake, at a comparable rate, whether or not the runner is training for an event.

Intra-workout hydration should also not be an issue if the runner hydrated in a way so as to have total body water (TBW) be greater than fifty percent.

The percent of body water at which the runner is dehydrated differs for each individual but the hypothesis used in this article will be fifty percent. Consuming steadily at a rate of four ounces every twenty minutes should allow the body to absorb the fluid and keep the runner hydrated so that the need for hydration during the even is significantly reduced.

The training regiment for such a run should be interval based and the intervals should not total greater than 4.5-miles. Once per week the full 3.2-miles should be performed. On some of the days that the runner is training for 3.2-miles they will actually run a total of 3.5-miles or more and on other days the distance covered will be 5k. Understandably for different distances, these numbers would differ.

Also check out these Last minute marathon training tips

Interval training allows the runner to progressively improve over time at whichever specific type of interval they are training in. If the intervals are fixed times then the runner should notice the distance covered in the same time to increase as a result of continuous training.

The runner may notice that the time in which it takes to complete a given distance decreasing as a result of using intervals of fixed distance during training. Both methods are effective but due to physiological individuality each method works differently for each runner.

Before you start the training plan in this article, make sure you run 5-km to see from where you start

so that at the end of the ninety day training cycle you can see your progression. There should be no more than two consecutive workouts during the training period. There should not be two consecutive rest days during the training period. The training period should end at least three days before the event.

Rest to work ratio of each workout should be three-to-one so you will need a timer. If a run took two minutes then you should rest for at least six minutes before attempting the next interval.

Try to get the same exact time or faster time every interval. Better to extend rest time to make this happen than to keep a constant rest to work ratio but not see similar or diminishing times. So if you have to use a rest to work ratio of 4:1 then that is indicated given the result of your run times. If 5:1 is indicated then that is what you will use and so forth.

Always get all the scheduled intervals completed during a given workout. It is more important to perform the workouts than to not do them. You are better of completing the workouts with slower times and the minimum 3:1 rest to work ratio than not even attempting the workout. On a day where six intervals need to be completed then that is what you should do even if the times are worse with each interval.

Exercise is an inherently physically stressful event on the body. It is important that individuals attempting the workouts in this article be aware of that. These workouts elevate the heart rate to a level of high intensity such that in some cases you will exceed 85% of your maximum heart rate. This article will assume that a high probability of chest discomfort exists when heart rate exceeds 90%.

If you use a chest strap with a heart rate monitor then you can check to see the highest that your heart rate can get without chest discomfort. There is a difference between chest pain and chest discomfort and chest pain is a symptom with which you should not train. When experiencing chest discomfort during training you should cease the workout or modify it and continue if able to do so without chest discomfort.

Use the rate of perceived exertion in place of chest strap and heart rate monitor. If on the ten point scale your rate of perceived exertion is 9.5 then your workout has to be scaled down. Another time to scale down your workout is when you are having chest pain or chest discomfort regardless of whether or not a heart rate monitor is being used.

Rate of perceived exertion supersedes a heart rate monitor. When in doubt use the rate of perceived exertion as an indicator to how you are feeling and doing.

Make sure you are running in a way where you can not talk but you can breathe. The 3.2-mile interval training program features a lot of sprints so the ability to speak during the intervals is very limited but you must be able to breathe.

Breathing should be done rhythmically until enough experience is attained where the you know to either be exhaling or inhaling each time your forefoot comes in contact with the running surface or comes off of it.

Some workouts will end with:

-fifty (or 100) repititions of air squats
-one hundred repititions of pushups
-one hundred repitions of squats

These are also known as 50/100/100 (or 100/100/100).

This program uses distance intervals. Numbers to the right followed by decimals represent the distance in miles. The leftmost numbers represent the number of intervals.

The following three-month workout plan should have you running like the wind at your next 5k:

Week one:

– Day One: 8 x 0.25 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 6 x 0.5
– Day Three: 3 x 1.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 5 x 0.75

Week two:

– Day One: 1 x 3.5 – 100/100/100
– Day Two: 12 x 0.25
– Day Three: 1 x 3.2 – 50/100/100
– Day Four: 2 x 1.5

Week three:

– Day One: 2 x 2.0 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 3 x 1.25
– Day Three: 2 x 1.75 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 4 x 1.0

Week four:

– Day One: 7 x 0.5
– Day Two: 1 x 4.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Three: 4 x 0.75
– Day Four: 3 x 1.5 – 50/100/100

Week five:

– Day One: 8 x 0.25 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 6 x 0.5
– Day Three: 3 x 1.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 5 x 0.75

Week six:

– Day One: 1 x 3.5 – 100/100/100
– Day Two: 12 x 0.25
– Day Three: 1 x 3.2 – 50/100/100
– Day Four: 2 x 1.5

Week seven:

– Day One: 2 x 2.0 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 3 x 1.25
– Day Three: 2 x 1.75 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 4 x 1.0

Week eight:

– Day One: 7 x 0.5
– Day Two: 1 x 4.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Three: 4 x 0.75
– Day Four: 3 x 1.5- 50/100/100

Week nine:

– Day One: 8 x 0.25 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 6 x 0.5
– Day Three: 3 x 1.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 5 x 0.75

Week ten:

– Day One: 1 x 3.5 – 100/100/100
– Day Two: 12 x 0.25
– Day Three: 1 x 3.2 – 50/100/100
– Day Four: 2 x 1.5

Week eleven:

– Day One: 2 x 2.0 – 50/100/100
– Day Two: 3 x 1.25
– Day Three: 2 x 1.75 – 100/100/100
– Day Four: 4 x 1.0

Week twelve:

– Day One: 7 x 0.5
– Day Two: 1 x 4.0 – 100/100/100
– Day Three: 4 x 0.75
– Day Four: 3 x 1.5 – 50/100/100A 5k training plan to awaken your hidden strengths_3Beware of elevated post exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). When this happens you may experience headaches or delayed chest pain. Your heart rate may stay above that of your resting heart rate for several hours after the workout until it returns to its’ normal resting rate. Headaches may also be a sign of dehydration as well as EPOC.

As said, one does not have to stick with 4-days/week at over 80% of maximum heart rate. You can start at one or two days a week and work your way up or just do 3 days a week until you feel like you can take on more.

Training at a high heart rate continuously for 4-days a week for longer than ninety days is not recommended as this level of training is not sustainable for most people.

Keep in mind that you might also have to rest for longer than a day should EPOC cause discomfort for longer than one day. If you feel discomfort from a workout in anyway 72 hours post-workout then you should seek the intervention of a medical health professional.

It is also important to know that before beginning any physical activity program that you have been given the clean bill of apparent health from your primary medical care provider and that you feel great. Increase your knowledge in the area of nutrition or consult a certified health professional about your diet because a poor diet can not be out-trained.

Why not try a diet, designed for runners by Scottish Adventurer Shona Thomson?

WatchFit Experts change lives!

And they can do the same for you.

Expert:

Pollyanna Hale Health and Lifestyle coaches
Lost 13 Kg in Total
Mel, 32y Location: London, United Kingdom Working with Pollyanna changed everything. I lost 13kg, got toned and have more energy than ever! Get same results!

Expert:

Chriz Zaremba Fitness Consultant
Lost 45 Kg in Total
Chris, 50y Location: London, United Kingdom Lost 45kg after the age of 50 and now competes and wins physique competitions and runs marathons Check our weight loss plans