Breakfast is the first meal of the day and I will say that there are two categories of people in this world: those who habitually have breakfast, and those who do not.

Some studies have suggested that there are benefits in having breakfast while there are even some that claim to show that there are benefits in not having breakfast, so there is a divide in this area.

The case FOR breakfast

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A prospective study published in 2013 in the American Heart Association Journal Circulation found that in male health professionals 45-82 years of age, eating breakfast was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular heart disease (CHD)(1).

The case AGAINST breakfast

Another study published in 2013 in the Physiology & Behaviour Journal found that in adults who skipped breakfast, they ate less by the end of the day (2).

If you are hungry in the morning eat breakfast but do it correctly. Not all breakfasts are created equal. Some are healthier than others.

Here are 3 foods to avoid for breakfast, what not to eat for breakfast…

1) Breakfast cereals

Breakfast cereals are what not to eat for breakfast.

They are made from highly processed grains and are full of sugar and refined carbohydrates.

If you start your day with a breakfast cereal loaded with sugar and refined carbohydrates, it will spike your blood sugar, increase your insulin levels and may increase your risk of various chronic diseases.

A study published in 2014 in the BMC Public Health Journal found excessive sugar consumption to be associated with a prevalence of Type 2 diabetes (3).

Pay no attention to the health claims on the front box of the breakfast cereal, check the ingredient list.

what not to eat for breakfast_22) Bread

Bread is what not to eat for breakfast.

It is high in refined carbohydrates and low in vital nutrients.

When you eat bread, it gets broken down quickly into glucose causing a quick spike to your blood sugar and insulin levels.

Did you know that even whole wheat bread will also cause a spike in your blood sugar and insulin levels? It has a glycemic index of 71 just like white wheat flour bread.

Bread also contains a lot of gluten and evidence has shown that a large population of people are sensitive to gluten. Gluten affects the digestive tract causing an immune response this can cause digestive issues and other symptoms.

3) Low-fat or fat-free yogurt

Did you know that many low-fat or fat-free yogurts have a lot of sugar or sweeteners added to it? So low-fat or fat-free yogurt is what not to eat for breakfast.

Fats have been regarded as the villain for a long time but they are actually very good for you.

A study published in 2010 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that there is no major evidence for concluding that dietary saturated fat is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (4)

It is healthier to eat the yogurt with all the fat left in it. Yogurt can be healthy.

It is rich in protein and beneficial probiotic bacteria. Full fat Greek yogurt is a good choice.

Most yogurts sold in the stores are loaded with sugar and other additives so read the label.

Conclusion

It is healthier to choose whole real food for breakfast. A protein and fibre rich breakfast is the best option.

Studies have shown that they can make you feel full for longer.

A study published in 2013 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that a breakfast rich in protein improved satiety, reduced food craving and evening snacking (5).

Another study published in 2005 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that replacing eggs with bagel-based breakfast can make you full for longer (at least 36 hours) and result in weight loss (6)

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References

1) Cahill L E,  Chiuve S E, Mekary R A, Jensen M K, Flint A J, Hu F B, Rimm E B (2013) Prospective study of breakfast eating and incident coronary heart disease in a cohort study of male US health professionals. American Heart Association Journal Circulation, 128: 337-343. PUBMED

2) Leidy HJ, Ortinau L C, Douglas S M, Hoertel H A (2013) Beneficial effects of a higher-protein breakfast on appetitive, hormonal and neural signals controlling energy intake regulation in overweight/obese, “breakfast-skipping,” late-adolescent girls. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 97: 677-688. PUBMED.

3) Weeratunga P, Jayainghe S, Perera Y, Jayasena G, Jayasinghe S (2014) Per capita sugar consumption and prevalence of diabetes mellitus – global and regional associations. BMC Public Health, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-186. PUBMED.

4) Siri-Tarino P W, Sun Q, Hu F B, Krauss R M (2010) Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies evaluating the association of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 91: 535 – 546 PUBMED.

5) Leidy H J, Ortinau L C, Douglas S M, Hoertel H A (2013) Beneficial effects of a higher-protein breakfast on the appetitive, hormonal, and neural signals controlling energy intake regulation in overweight/obese, “breakfast-skipping,” lat-adolescent girls. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 97: 677-688 PUBMED..

6) Vander W J S, Marth J M, Khosla P, Jen K L, Dhurandhar N V (2005) Short-term effect of eggs on satiety in overweight and obese subjects. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 24: 510-515 PUBMED.

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